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91351-36500 : Rod - Buffer For Mitsubishi & Caterpillar 91351-36500 : Rod - Buffer For Mitsubishi & Caterpillar

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NUT  HEX FOR MITSUBISHI 103024 Nut - Hex For Mitsubishi: 103024

MITSUBISHI FORKLIFT PARTS

NUT  HEX FOR MITSUBISHI 1050242 Nut - Hex For Mitsubishi: 1050242

MITSUBISHI FORKLIFT PARTS

NUT  HEX FOR MITSUBISHI 1135160 Nut - Hex For Mitsubishi: 1135160

MITSUBISHI FORKLIFT PARTS

NUT  HEX FOR MITSUBISHI 120367 Nut - Hex For Mitsubishi: 120367

MITSUBISHI FORKLIFT PARTS

   
 

Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi Is a large Japanese conglomerate that uses the Tokyo Stock Exchange market and consists of many independent operated companies representing a wide cross section of industries that include machinery, mining, construction, transport, warehousing, steel, real estate, chemicals, textiles and metal products. Mitsubishi estimates that the numbers of companies owned by them is over 200. The Mitsubishi Symbol has also come to represents a value based three pronged philosophy for conducting business, even to this day, the idea was adopted back in 1870 by Mitsubishis founding father, Yataro Iwasaki, known as the three principles: Shoki Hoki (Corporate Responsibility to Society), Shoji Komei (Intergrity and Fairness), and Ritsugyo Boeki (International Understanding through Trade).

Company History - Mitsubishi's dates back to 1870 when the founder and first president, Yataro Iwasaki bought three old steamships from his clan and made his own shipping company. The company had rapid growth, changing names over the years, to finally become known as Mitsubishi Mail Steamship Co., Mitsubishi was also the first Japanese company that to try out the overseas market. In the early 1880's, Japanese government took the liberty of sponsoring the establishment of a rival company. The rivalry between them almost ended Mitsubishi. In 1885 Yataro has passed away and was succeeded by his younger brother, Yanosuke.

Diversifying and Decentralizing Operations - In the upcoming years, Under Yanosuke's leadership, Mitsubishi has diversified its businesses operations, focusing on the growth of the company in the mining and shipbuilding business.

Mitsubishi in the Modern Era - in 1916 Koyata Iwasaki, took over the presidency from his Father Yanosuke. Koyata as a graduate of Cambridge University led Mitsubishi into a modern era that incorporated Mitsubishi divisions into independent companies. AS Koyata as president, Mitsubushi has become a leader in electrical, equipment, machinery and chemical sectors. In 1934 these companies would merge to form Mitsubishi Heavy Industries that manufactured a range of products from aircrafts, automobiles, tanks and buses. World war two had a direct impact on Mitsubishi and their organizational infrastructure, Slowly the Iwasaki family was losing the grip on the company shares and many core holding companies were released to the public. By the wars end investors made up half of the company’s equity. In the end Mitsubishi’s headquarters disbanded, leading to corporate fragmentation that resulted in formation of thousands of autonomous enterprises. In 1946 companies that were part of Mitsubishi gave up its name and trademark logo due being pressured from the occupation forces. In 1954 a group of 100 companies that had been a part of Mitsubishi has started to regroup and to reestablished original Mitsubishi name and logo. Mitsubishi started to flourish again during the 50's and 60's. The company continued to expand in their existing branches and new ventures.

The Company Today - Mitsubishi Heavy Industries consists of over 130 different companies encompassing a range of product categories. With headquarters based in Japan, MHI employs approximately 62,940 people worldwide and reported net revenues of $26, 234.5 million in 2006. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is a Fortune 500 company ranking in at 257 in 2007 and garnering a second place spot behind Caterpillar in the industrial and farm equipment industry.